SMSC at Iqra


 
At Iqra Primary School, the children and their learning are at the very heart of every decision made. We aim to develop learners who are passionate, take ownership of their learning and are proud of their achievements.The ethos at IQRA implements a holistic approach to SMSC (Spiritual, Moral, Social and Cultural) development. At IQRA we deeply value the spiritual, moral, social and cultural aspects of life that help us to understand what it is to be human. This richness of SMSC is threaded through our school environment. Pupils are encouraged to regard people of all faiths, races and cultures with respect and tolerance. They learn through our broad and balanced curriculum that while different people may hold different views about what is ‘right’ and ‘wrong’, all people living in England are subject to its law.

Adults lead the way in empowering children to learn about the world beyond the classroom and fathom their place in it, a world with a plethora of backgrounds, views and faiths; to be accepted, cherished and understood. In planning lessons, teachers are aware of the need to plan opportunities to develop a wide variety of spiritual, moral, social and cultural needs. A vast majority will be delivered through cross curricular activities as well as specific PSHE, RE and Circle Time activities.

Spiritual Development

What Iqra does to encourage students’ Spiritual development

Curriculum opportunities enable pupils to:

  • Have a sense of enjoyment and fascination in learning about themselves, others and the world around them
  • Be curious and to express feelings of delight and wonder, (scientific investigations, chemical reactions, new life, the global landscape)
  • Empathise and consider the viewpoints of others, (debates, drama activities, discussing feelings and empathising with characters in familiar stories)
  • Consider how a belief can change people’s lifestyles , (R.E, investigating communities and faiths, historical case studies)
  • Discuss what they think they have achieved and what they need to do to be successful in the future, (self assessment, target setting activities)

“And of His signs is the creation of the heavens and the earth and the diversity of your
languages and your colors. Indeed in that are signs for those of knowledge.” (Quran 30:22)

Moral Development

Islam is used as a reference point to help children understand how its teachings may be similar or different to others.

“O you who have believed, let not a people ridicule [another] people….. And do not insult one another and do not call each other by [offensive] nicknames.” (Quran 49:11)

The teaching of PSHE (Personal, Social, Health Education) is a key part of the school life. Weekly themes build on children’s moral understanding of their own views and those of others through assemblies, circle time and Friday prayers. Children are encouraged to give an opinion and be respectful of those that are different to their own. Through open discussions and a safe environment for children to express their views, they are given the skills to understand the importance of tolerance for all at KS1 while articulating their own beliefs. Within KS2 children are effectively taught empathy allowing them to be aware of the harms of bullying and derogatory language (including language about disabled people, racism, homophobia and those with different beliefs) as being against the law.

What Iqra does to encourage students’ moral development?

The classroom environment and curriculum promote moral development through:

  • Codes of conduct and class rules, agreed with children and displayed in the classroom
  • A clear and consistent rewards and sanctions that children understand and believe to be fair.
  • Class and phase assemblies that discuss moral values and cite expectations.
  • Activities that enable pupils to give opinions and show their values.
  • Discussing the choices made by the pupils and others and the resulting outcomes, character studies, studies of historical figures).

As part of PHSE, Topic work and Literacy, pupils are given opportunities to explore moral dilemmas. These are used as a platform to encourage children to think critically about their faith and how their beliefs can help them to make positive decisions in a real life context. Highly skilled questions are used to allow the children to understand moral dilemmas and decisions in the wider world. In particular, a variety of quality texts are used to do this.

Prophet Muhammad (peace be upon him) said: “I have only been sent to perfect good moral character.”

Hannah Khan contributed to the wider community by helping her father to mow their
neighbours grass whilst they were away on holiday to India.

Islam considers the rights of the neighbour to be extremely important. Prophet
Muhammad (Peace be upon Him) promoted ….”We should serve your neighbour
generously. A good Muslim is always good to his neighbour.”

Social Development

At IQRA Primary School, the understanding of societal institutions and those who serve us within them are manifested through a truly inspiring curriculum. These take the form of high quality lessons in which co-operation and team work is encouraged in all classes. Children regularly partake in sports, art, music, and literacy, mathematical and learning

based competitions. They have exposure to a range of public figures such as doctors, nurses, scientists, local police, sportsmen and women, the local mayor and members of parliament. By understanding the value of public institutions, pupils are able to become inspirational members of the community – we take pride in knowing that children from IQRA are able to take learning beyond the school day, through a vibrant after school club provision

What Iqra does to encourage students’ Social development:

At IQRA Primary School social skills are developed through:

  • Modelling of positive social behaviour by all staff
  • A broad and balanced curriculum
  • Partaking in trips and workshops related to the wider world
  • After school clubs
  • Sporting activities
  • Buddy and team games at play times and lunch times
  • Turn taking and team building activities
  • Pair and small group work within the classroom
  • Working with others across the local community (local care homes, cluster schools)

The understanding of societal institutions and those who serve us within them are manifested through a truly inspiring curriculum. These take the form of high quality lessons in which co-operation and team work is encouraged in all classes. Children regularly partake in sports, art, music, and literacy, mathematical and learning based competitions. They have exposure to a range of public figures such as doctors, nurses, scientists, local police, sportsmen and women, the local mayor and members of parliament. By understanding the value of public institutions and British Law, pupils are able to become inspirational members of the community – we take pride in knowing that children from IQRA are able to take learning beyond the school day, through a vibrant after school club provision.

Cultural Development

Children are introduced to a regional and global perspective in life through:

  • Links with local and international schools
  • Stories from different cultures
  • First hand experiences through local visits, theatre, art and artists
  • Visitors from the local and international community
  • Being part of National and International fund raising events
  • Studies of a different lifestyle including different food, dress, festivals and places of worship.

Children are encouraged to appreciate the cultural diversity of Britain and understand that use of derogatory or prejudice based language are an anathema to the Islamic faith.

“……Be ever steadfast in upholding equity, bearing witness to the truth for the sake of God, even though it be against your own selves or your parents and kinsfolk. Whether the person concerned be rich or poor, God’s claim takes precedence over [the claims of] either of them.” (Qur’an 4:135)

Children appreciate role models from different back grounds and faiths and learn about the contribution they have made to society. They have studied inspirational figures from Islamic history and those from other faiths such as Nelson Mandela and Ghandi to consider why their legacies are still relevant today. Children appreciate that these key figures share common characteristics which underpin their humanity.

The Prophet Muhammad (peace be upon Him), during his Last Sermon, said:

“Neither is their preference for white people over black people, nor for black people over white people. Preference is only through righteousness.”